Bipolar Disorder: A Complete Guide to Living With Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder, previously called manic depression, is a mental health condition that causes extreme mood changes including highs (mania or hypomania) and low mood (depressive disorder) also known as bipolar depression.

Bipolar disorder is a mental illness that can also be considered a medical condition.

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, is a mental illness that affects millions of people across the world.

The National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) explains that in order to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder, an individual must have symptoms for at least seven days, or less if symptoms are serious enough to require hospitalization.

To receive a diagnosis of bipolar II, a person must have experienced at least one cycle of hypomania and depression.

Episodes of hypomania and depression are shorter and less intense than mania and depression caused by bipolar I or bipolar II.

Depressive episodes occur as well, but most people with bipolar II experience periods of stability and normal mood in between the mania and depressive episodes.

Sometimes, people experience both manic and depressive symptoms during a single episode.

People with bipolar 1, they may even have a mixture of depressive and manic symptoms in quick succession.

What is Bipolar Disorder Symptoms

Because symptoms are similar, people who experience bipolar depression are sometimes misdiagnosed as having severe depression or depressive disorder alone.

When individuals present with symptoms of bipolar as well as experiencing periods of psychosis separate from mood episodes, a schizoaffective disorder might be an appropriate diagnosis.

Severe bipolar episodes of mania or depression can involve psychotic symptoms, such as hallucinations or delusions.

Brief periods of mania or depression can be a marker for more serious episodes in the future, but are generally not sufficient to diagnose a person with bipolar disorder.

By the time obvious symptoms of mania or depression occur, it is usually too late to catch the mood wave, so monitor for subtle changes in your mood, sleeping patterns, energy levels, and thoughts.

Living With Bipolar Disorder

If you spot subtle changes in mood early on, and take action quickly, you can potentially prevent a slight shift in mood from turning into a full-blown episode of mania or depression.

Some people with bipolar disorder also have depressive or hypomanic episodes, and the majority of people with bipolar disorder also experience periods of neutral mood.

During manic episodes, people with bipolar I disorder feel an extreme surge in energy, and they can feel like they are at the top of the world, or they can be uncomfortablely irritable.

Bipolar I is marked by at least one manic episode, and the vast majority of people with bipolar I also have significant depressive episodes.

People with bipolar disorder experience a cycle of highs and lows–known as mania and depression–that is different than the typical ups and downs that most people experience.

Unlike a simple mood swing, each extreme bipolar episode may last several weeks (or longer).

Severe bipolar episodes of mania or depression can involve psychotic symptoms, such as hallucinations or delusions.

In severe manic episodes, the individual may have psychotic symptoms, in which the content of thoughts is affected in conjunction with the mood.

These mood episodes are classified as either manic/hypomanic (abnormally happy or irritable moods) or depressive (sad moods).

They key aspect to living with bipolar disorder is to take your prescribed, proven medication along with therapy.

How is Bipolar Diagnosed

Before going to see a doctor, patients with bipolar disorder are encouraged to keep track of their moods throughout the day.

Keeping these records can help establish patterns of behavior that can aid in establishing a proper diagnosis.

This is the first step on how bipolar disorder is diagnosed. A doctor will also compare your bipolar disorder symptoms to those of other conditions.

For example, you may be suffering from a major depression instead of bipolar disorder, or you may be addicted to substances such as alcohol or drugs. A correct diagnosis will help you understand your symptoms and make a plan for treatment.

Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

The symptoms of bipolar disorder vary from patient to patient, but are characterized by dramatic changes in mood.

People with this condition may experience severe swings in their energy levels and mood, affecting their sleep, self-esteem, and even physical health.

Bipolar disorder is diagnosed can also lead to increased risk for cardiovascular and migraine diseases. In addition, children with bipolar disorder may be more difficult to diagnose because their moods are more extreme and their energy levels fluctuate more frequently.

You may experience a mood that is more energetic (mania or hypomania), less energetic (depression), or a combination of the two.

When experiencing a mood shift, you might feel very energetic and be easily excited. You may feel your ups and downs are extreme, and the fluctuations of mood are overwhelming.

For example, for some people, after they have had mania treated, a normal mood can feel like depression, as they enjoyed a high caused by their mania episode.

You can have a hypomanic episode, or a major depression, both before and after having a manic episode.

A physician diagnoses bipolar II after at least one depressive episode and at least one hypomanic episode.

To diagnose bipolar I, the persons manic episode must have lasted for at least seven days, or it is so severe that it requires hospitalization.

To be diagnosed, a person must have at least one mania episode and one depressive episode.

More Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness causing abnormal changes in mood, from extreme highs (mania) to lows (depression).

A person with bipolar disorder will experience episodes of mania (highs) while also experiencing episodes of depression (lows) at other times.

For individuals who have Bipolar 1, they may also experience a mixture of depression and manic symptoms in quick succession.

Bipolar I is marked by at least one manic episode, and the vast majority of people with Bipolar I will also have significant depressive episodes.

During manic episodes, individuals with bipolar I experience extreme increases in energy, and can feel on top of the world, or distressingly anxious.

People with bipolar disorder experience alternating highs and lows — known as mania and depression — that are different than the typical ups and downs that most people experience.

Episodes of hypomania and depression are shorter and less intense than mania and depression caused by bipolar I or bipolar II.

The symptoms are less severe than a full-blown mania or depression.

For example, for some people, after they have had mania treated, a normal mood can seem depressed, as they enjoyed the high caused by their mania episode.

Hypomanic episodes do not reach the complete extremes of mania (they usually do not produce serious social or occupational difficulties, nor are there any psychotic symptoms),

and this can make bipolar II more difficult to diagnose, because a hypomanic episode can just seem to occur during periods of high success in performance, and is reported less often than distressing, incapacitating depression.

Bipolar depression is a mood disorder in which a person experiences at times extreme mood swings, which may last for weeks at a time.

Bipolar disorder, also called manic-depressive disease, is a mental disorder that causes people to have both high and low moods.

Bipolar Disorder Medications

Treatment of bipolar disorder usually involves the use of mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. The medication prescribed to you will depend on your symptoms.

Some people respond better to certain medications than others, so it’s important to communicate your preferences and your response to medication.

Your healthcare provider will work with you to develop a treatment plan that is right for you.

This will be your best option. But remember to consult with your provider if you have any questions or concerns.

Bipolar Disorder and Genetics

Bipolar disorder is diagnosed is a lifelong disease. While some people experience only one episode of mania, many others suffer multiple episodes over the course of their lives.

And unlike most medical illnesses, bipolar disorder isn’t a flickering switch. Most doctors agree that bipolar disorder is genetic.

You might experience episodes of mania and depression over a period of days or weeks. Other people may have episodes that last for a day or longer. A thorough diagnosis and treatment plan will help you cope with the disorder.

Genetics play a role in developing the disorder. The likelihood of developing bipolar disorder is increased in families where one or both parents suffer from it.

However, genetics do not play an absolute role – identical twins can have bipolar disorder and not have While medications can help with some symptoms of bipolar disorder, therapy teaches you skills that can be used across areas of your life.

I will always have an extreme depressive cycle, as well as an extreme manic episode, but learning to control and continually work on your mental health can completely transform the way you look at life.

Avoiding alcohol and illicit drugs is a huge part of recovering from a manic episode or depression symptoms, and it helps to build stability.it!

Furthermore, stress and other stressful situations can trigger a manic or depressive episode. A doctor will also determine whether a person has a strong family history of bipolar disorder is diagnosed.

Bipolar Disorder Depression

Bipolar disorder is diagnosed and may be associated with a depressive episode. The lows associated with bipolar depression may be debilitating.

You may have trouble sleeping and sleep more than you normally do, and you may become obsessed with negative thoughts, such as suicide or self-harm.

In addition, it’s important to note that a person needs to have both of these sptoms for it to be diagnosed.

Moreover, treatment for depression associated with bipolar disorder may be more complicated and requires a customized treatment plan.

The extreme highs and lows of bipolar disorder is mania and depression. This why it is always recommended to treat the mania as well as the depression.

How Bipolar Disorder Affects The Brain

Bipolar disorder is a mental illness that causes people to experience extreme changes in mood. The highs, or manic episodes, can last for weeks or even months.

During these times, people with bipolar disorder may feel extremely happy and have lots of energy. They may also act impulsively and make poor decisions.

The lows, or depressive episodes, can be just as extreme. People may feel hopeless and worthless. They may also have very little energy and find it hard to get out of bed.

Bipolar disorder affects the brain by causing drastic changes in mood and energy levels. These changes can make it difficult for people to function normally.

Bipolar disorder is a serious condition that requires treatment. With proper treatment, most people with bipolar disorder can lead happy and healthy lives.

What Causes Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is caused by a number of factors including brain abnormalities, chemical imbalances in the brain and other stressors.

Common triggers include sleep disturbance and changes in routine. Bipolar disorder is a circadian rhythm disorder, which means that it is characterized by changes in sleep patterns.

For many people with bipolar disorder, disruptions in their sleep can trigger manic or depressive episodes.

Changes in routine, such as starting a new job or going on vacation, can also be triggers.

There are also some physical health conditions that can trigger bipolar disorder. These include thyroid problems, certain types of infections, and brain injuries.

If you have any of these health conditions, it is important to discuss them with your mental health professional so that they can be taken into account when treating your bipolar disorder.

In addition to the above triggers, there are also some environmental factors that can contribute to the development of the bipolar disorder.

These include exposure to certain chemicals, such as pesticides, and living in a chaotic or stressful environment.

If you think that you may be exposed to any of these environmental factors, it is important to speak to your mental health professional so that they can help you avoid them.

It is also important to remember that bipolar disorder is a complex condition, and there is not always one clear trigger.

Sometimes, a combination of different factors can contribute to the development of the bipolar disorder.

If you are concerned that you may be at risk for developing bipolar disorder, it is important to speak to your mental health professional so that they can assess your individual situation.

Main Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

The symptoms of bipolar disorder can vary from person to person. Some people experience mostly manic episodes, while others have mostly depressive episodes.

Some people have both types of episodes that include mania and depression, but their symptoms may be different during each type.

Mania Symptoms May Include:

  • Engaging in risky behaviors, such as spending sprees, impulsive sex, or reckless driving
  • Feeling extremely happy or “high”
  • Having lots of energy
  • Being easily distractible
  • Talking more than usual
  • Feelings like your thoughts are racing
  • Acting impulsively

Depressive Symptoms May Include:

  • Feeling hopeless or worthless.
  • Having little energy or interest In regular activities.
  • Sleeping too much or not being able to sleep
  • Eating too much or not being able to eat
  • Feelings like your thoughts are moving slowly
  • Having trouble concentrating or making decisions
  • Thinking about death or suicide.

What are the Different Types of Bipolar Disorder

There are four basic types of bipolar disorder; each type differs in how often the person experiences manic or depressive episodes.

1. Bipolar I Disorder: Bipolar I disorder is defined by manic episodes that last at least seven days (or by manic symptoms that are so severe that hospitalization is necessary). Depressive episodes may also occur, typically lasting at least two weeks. However, it is not necessary to experience a depressive episode to be diagnosed with bipolar I disorder.

2. Bipolar II Disorder: Bipolar II disorder is defined by a pattern of depressive episodes and hypomanic episodes, but not full-blown manic episodes.

3. Cyclothymic Disorder: Cyclothymic disorder, or cyclothymia, is a milder form of bipolar disorder that is characterized by chronic, low-grade depressive and hypomanic symptoms.

4. Other Specified and Unspecified Bipolar and Related Disorders: The other specified bipolar and related disorder category is for disorders that do not meet the criteria for any specific type of bipolar disorder but still involve periods of abnormally elevated mood.

The unspecified bipolar and related disorder category is for disorders that share some features with bipolar disorders but don’t meet the full criteria for any specific type of bipolar disorder.

Bipolar disorder is a lifelong condition that can be managed with medication and psychotherapy. Early diagnosis and treatment are important in preventing serious complications, such as suicide.

Risk Factors For Bipolar Disorder

there are many risks for bipolar disorder. Here are some of the main risk factors for people with bipolar disorder

Family History of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder often runs in families, which suggests that genetics may play a role in its development. If you have a parent or close relative with bipolar disorder, your risk of developing the condition is increased.

Personal History of Depression

People who have had one or more episodes of major depression are at greater risk for developing bipolar disorder. It’s unclear why, but there may be a biological link between the two conditions.

Stressful Life Events

While stressful life events don’t cause bipolar disorder, they can trigger an episode in people who are already vulnerable to the condition. These events might include the death of a loved one, losing a job, financial problems, or relationship difficulties.

Substance Abuse

People with bipolar disorder are more likely to have a problem with alcohol or drugs. Substance abuse can contribute to the development of the bipolar disorder and make episodes more frequent and severe.

It can also make it harder to treat the condition. If you have bipolar disorder, it’s important to get help for any substance abuse problems you may have.

Complications Of Bipolar Disorder

There are many complications of bipolar disorder. Here are some of those complications below.

Relationship Events

Relationship problems are another common complication of bipolar disorder. The mood swings associated with the disorder can make it difficult to maintain healthy relationships. People with bipolar disorder may also have difficulty functioning at work or home, which can put a strain on relationships.

Financial Problems

Financial problems are another common complication of bipolar disorder. The cost of treatment lost work days, and hospitalizations can add up quickly. Bipolar disorder can also lead to job loss and homelessness.

Self-Harm Or Suicide

Self-harm or suicide attempts are also common complications of bipolar disorder.

People with bipolar disorder are more likely to attempt or complete suicide than people without the disorder. If you or someone you know is in danger of harming themselves, please get help immediately.

If you or someone you know is living with bipolar disorder, there are many resources available to help manage the condition. Treatment can be effective in managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

How Bipolar Disorder is Diagnosed

A mental health professional will ask about your symptoms and medical history. They may also conduct a physical exam to rule out other conditions.

If they suspect you have bipolar disorder, they may refer you to a psychiatrist or psychologist for further evaluation.

During the evaluation, the mental health professional will ask you questions about your moods, thoughts, and behaviors. They may also ask you to keep a mood chart to track your symptoms over time. 

If you are diagnosed with bipolar disorder, the mental health professional will work with you to develop a treatment plan.

Treatments For Bipolar Disorder

There is no cure for bipolar disorder, but it can be treated. Treatment usually involves medication and therapy.

Medication: Medications used to treat bipolar disorder include mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Mood stabilizers are the most commonly prescribed type of medication. They can help to control manic and depressive episodes. Antipsychotics and antidepressants may also be prescribed to help control symptoms.

Therapy: Therapy can help you to manage your symptoms and cope with the stress of living with bipolar disorder. Therapies that may be helpful include cognitive behavioral therapy, family-focused therapy, and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy.

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): ECT is a treatment that uses electrical impulses to stimulate the brain. It is typically used as a last resort for people who do not respond to medication or therapy.

Possible Outcomes Of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is a chronic condition that requires lifelong treatment. With proper treatment, many people with bipolar disorder are able to live normal, healthy lives. However, some people may experience episodes of mania or depression even with treatment.

Bipolar disorder can also lead to complications, such as substance abuse, relationship problems, financial problems, and job loss. In some cases, it can also lead to self-harm or suicide attempts/completions. 

If you have bipolar disorder, it is important to stick to your treatment plan. You should also make sure to keep all appointments with your mental health professional and let them know if your symptoms are getting worse. If you are in need if metal help, seek help immediately or go see a doctor.

Different Ways to Treat Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder, or manic-depressive is a mental illness that causes mood swings of different lengths.

It can make you feel high, low, or even have no feelings towards anything. These highs and lows cause it hard to live with bipolar disorder because you never know what to expect next.

Luckily, there are treatments available. This article discusses the best ways to treat bipolar disorder, from medication and therapy options to alternative therapies like yoga and meditation.

While there are multiple options for treating bipolar disorder, there are still ways to treat it. Medications and therapy can help treat bipolar disorder and are a good option for many people.

Doctors usually prescribe medication to help control mood swings. For example, lithium is a drug that helps treat bipolar depression.

Best Bipolar Disorder Treatment Options

  • Medication Options
  • Therapy Options
  • Yoga Options
  • Alternative Options
  • Alternative Medication Options

Many different types of medication can be used to treat bipolar disorder. The most common are mood stabilizers and antipsychotic medications.

Mood stabilizers help control the highs and lows, while antipsychotic drugs help with symptoms of psychosis, like delusions and hallucinations. Here is more about treating bipolar disorder below.

Bipolar Disorder Medications

In this day and time, there are many medications to choose from for your bipolar disorder. The most important aspect is to find the right medication’s that work best for you and your bipolar disorder. Sometimes this may require test and trial until you are able to find the right medication combo that works for you.

Therapy Choices

Therapy is a popular choice for treating bipolar disorder. In-person visits allow you to talk to a therapist in person, and it helps you work through the issues that come up with the condition. You might also have the option to do therapy online or on the phone, which can be more convenient for some people.

Yoga Options

Yoga is an excellent option for treating bipolar disorder because it’s a great way to relieve stress and anxiety. It’s also a perfect option for people already dealing with stress and anxiety because it reduces stress and anxiety.

Alternative Options

Different people with bipolar disorder have other triggers and have different reactions.

When someone is bipolar, their emotions vary wildly and can react differently.

As such, everyone has different needs regarding treatment and coping strategies. For example, while one person might need medication and therapy, another might prefer yoga or meditation.

Finding a treatment plan is often a challenging task because many options exist. But it’s not impossible.

The key is finding which methods work best for you as an individual.

A great way to start is to try out some alternative therapies that might work for you. For example, if you like being active when feeling low, try walking outside or exercising regularly.

More Ways to Treat and Cope With Bipolar Disorder

If you prefer calming activities, try listening to music or doing something that requires very little energy, like reading a book or watching TV.

  • You can also go into nature- what better way to relax than by taking in some fresh air?
  • When trying new things, don’t worry about how they feel in the moment- see how they make you feel after doing them for a while.

The best way to treat bipolar disorder is to find the right treatment option, which can vary depending on your conditions and the stringency of your symptoms.

With the proper treatment, you can enjoy a better quality of life and manage your symptoms without the risk of relapse.

In the first place, you should consult your doctor about what sort of condition you’re dealing with and how they would like you to treat it.

It would help if you also got a physical check-up, so your doctor has something to work off, including medical tests to rule out other possible causes.

More Ways to Treat Bipolar Disorder

Mood stabilizers for bipolar such as lithium and anticonvulsants are the off label treatment of this disease.

These are considered one of the best treatments to control mood swings/disorders in bipolar disorder. However, none of them is proven first-line treatments through the FDA.

According to specialized doctors of mental illness, mood stabilizers can be made more effective with the addition of antidepressants.

In contrast, research shows that adding antidepressants with mood stabilizers is frequently not effective to treat bipolar depression.

The main purpose of mood-stabilizing is to improve social interaction, behaviour and bipolar mood states like depression and mania.

FDA approved medications to treat bipolar depression includes lithium, valproate, atypical antipsychotic and carbamazepine.

The American psychiatric association recommended these are the effective medications for treating one or more phases of bipolar disorder.

Some patients recover with a single mood stabilizer. At the same time, the depressed mood of many people recovers with the addition of an atypical antipsychotic.

Antidepressants For Bipolar Disorder

Antidepressants wirk best for the depression side of bipolar disorder. Antidepressants also prove to be an effective medication for those who suffer from unipolar disorder.

In contrast, antidepressants treat bipolar depression Do not work well when by itself, so they should not be given alone to cure depression and mania. But they should be given with a bipolar mania medication.

Medications to Treat Bipolar Disorders

Short-term treatment of this disease includes a medication named quetiapine. Many other options are considered to cure this mental illness, such as olanzapine with fluoxetine. Some of the bipolar disorder antidepressants include:

  • Paxil
  • Celexa
  • zoloft
  • And more

Below you will find some of the main bipolar disorder mood slabalizer medications.

  • Lithium
  • Risperdone
  • Depakote
  • Lamictal
  • and More

To treat bipolar disorder, antipsychotic medications are sometimes used alone or combined with lithium or Depakote.

One of the off-label options to cure this disease is cariprazine. These medications improve the mood and behaviour of patients who have mental illnesses. It works by affecting neurotransmitters, also called receptors.

Some of the main Bipolar Disorder Antipsychotics Include:

  • Serequel
  • Olanzapine
  • Risperdone
  • and More

Benzodiazepines are included in these depressants that act on neurotransmitters. It typically slows down normal brain function. Central nervous system depressants (CNS) cure sleep chaos and apprehension. However, it is also an alternative treatment to cure mania. These bipolar medications names are: 

  • Xanax
  • Klonopin
  • Valium
  • Ativan

These are just some of the main benzodiazepines that are used to help treat bipolar disorder. Here is a Bipolar depression treatment.

Electroconvulsive Therapy to Treat Bipolar Depression

American psychiatrists recommend the ECT treatment to cure severe depression. It is the preferred way to adopt this medication for those patients who suffer from psychotic symptoms.

It is suggested for those who are at very high risk of suicide.

Those who are not recovered with other treatments are suggested to treat with ECT. This therapy involves the electrical stimulation of the brain.

Most pregnant women who tolerate mania or severe depression benefit from this therapy. You have to discuss the pros and cons of ECT with your doctor.

Psychotherapy to Treat Bipolar Depression

Psychotherapy may prove beneficial in the medication history of bipolar disorders. This therapy aims to inform the patients how they effectively manage their interpersonal problems.

This also encouraged the people suffering from bipolar disorder to stay on medication.

It also helps to improve the lifestyle habits of patients. According to the STEP-BD study, bipolar medications with different therapy can significantly enhance recovery. This therapy includes:

  • Psychotherapy
  • Cognitive-behavioural therapy 
  • Social rhythm therapy 
  • Family-focused therapy etc
  • Psychotherapy
  • Along with medication

Side effects of bipolar Disorder Medications

Some typical side effects of these medications involve:

  • Constipation 
  • Dizziness
  • Tremors 
  • Indigestion 
  • Hair loss
  • Headache 
  • Dry mouth

It is compulsory to discuss with your doctor to regulate your drug therapy. A variety of people have different symptoms of bipolar disorders

Things You May Not Know About Bipolar Disorder

There are a lot of things about bipolar that we do known and there are a lot of things that we do not know. Here are probably some things that you did not know about bipolar.

But first, what exactly is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder, also called manic depression, is a mental illness mood disorder that causes individuals to experience periods of high and low mood.

Bipolar disorder, previously called manic depression, is a mental health condition that causes extreme mood swings and mood changes, including highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression).

Bipolar disorder, formerly called manic depression, is a mental health brain disorder condition that is characterized by periods of depression and periods of abnormally high energy levels lasting several days or weeks each.

A person with bipolar disorder will go through episodes of mania (highs) while experiencing episodes of depression (lows) at other times.

Bipolar disorder is a medical condition. A person with bipolar disorder will experience changes in mood, energy, and activity levels, which may make daily living difficult.

A person with the disorder can have periods of highly elevated or irritable moods, defined as manic episodes, along with episodes of depression.

Bipolar disorder causes major changes in mood, energy, thought, and behavior – from highs of mania at one extreme to lows of depression at the other. Here are some things you may not know about bipolar disorder..

Bipolar People are Smart

It is a proven fact that most people with bipolar disorder have a higher than average IQ. Some people with bipolar disorder are very smart and creative at the same time.

There are study’s that show the people with bipolar disorder have a very high intelligence.

On average, people that have bipolar disorder have a 10% higher IQ than the average person. There have been many studies on the bipolar person compared to the regular person and the bipolar person always showed a higher IQ level.

It has also been noted that people with bipolar are more articulate and creative as well as smart. There have been documented cases of genius syndrome from certain bipolar people.

Bipolar Disorder Can be Genetic

can run in family bloodlines. have shown that bipolar disorder. It can be known for skipping a generation but it always seems to happen to a family member down the line.

As a matter of fact, studies have also shown the bipolar disorder is frequently inherited.

The inheritance rate is so high that it has 80 percent inheritance rate that it will be passed on to a direct descendant. Bipolar disorder is the most common type of mental illness to be passed down through families.

Not only is bipolar disorder genetic but so is substance abuse. Because now a person can be genetically susceptible to bipolar disorder and to substance abuse.

Now they have two major problems to overcome. This is a horrible trait because alcohol or drugs are not good at all with bipolar disorder.

Bipolar Disorder Can Be Triggered by Past Events

Traumatic events can bring on a bipolar state. Even less traumatic events can cause a bipolar episode. Unlike PTSD, trauma events can and will cause a bipolar episode.

A study in 2020 showed that experiencing a traumatic event in childhood increases the chances of a person developing bipolar as the get older.

The worse the traumatic event was, the more sever the bipolar can be. The reason for this is that the person is re-thinking or re-living the traumatic event and that is enough to develop a bipolar episode.

In some cases, older people have been triggered by past events that caused them to cycle into a bipolar state.

Bipolar Disorder Can Lie Dormant for Years

A person can live many years of their life, especially their younger years, and never know they have bipolar. Its always been there.

Its just been dormant and waiting for the right circumstances and time to come out as a bipolar episode.

Generally bipolar disorder will show itself sometimes in the teen years. Over half the cases of bipolar start by the age of 25.

Studies have also shown that bipolar can lay dormant in a person for years. If a person has a bipolar episode because the bipolar was laying dormant in them is called a late onset of bipolar disorder.

In some cases a person might have a late onset of bipolar when their older. Especially if there was a trigger or a life changing event.

People With Bipolar Can Have Highs and Lows at the Same Time

When a person with bipolar has highs and lows at the same time this is called a mixed state or a mixed episode during the bipolar state.

You can have mania, depression, hypomania and even psychoses at the same time. It is very true and it does happen.

One example is that you can be depressed, upset and even felling hurtful and at the same time you will be feeling manic, full of energy, talkative even agitated.

As mentioned before, these are called mixed states or mixed episodes and they are very real.

You can even feel full on depression accompanied by full on mania at the same time. Mixed episodes can be the worst and most unpredictable and probably require hospitalization.

Most People With Bipolar Tend to Suffer From Substance Abuse

It is a sad and common fact that most people with bipolar disorder also suffer from some sort of substance abuse problems.

Whether it is alcohol or drugs. The person with bipolar uses these substances to cover up or mask the symptoms of bipolar disorder.

This just makes the symptoms worse and makes the bipolar worse. A major medical study showed that about 60% of people with bipolar disorder also suffers from drugs or alcohol use. That is an extremely high percentage of people.

The effects can not only make the symptoms worse, it can also bring on a bipolar state. Whether it is a manic state or depressive state.

And lastly, the substance abuse problem can also be temporary so you now have two heredity factors to deal with.

People With Bipolar Are at a High Risk of Getting Other Diseases

People with bipolar disorder are definitely prone to getting other diseases. The medical term for it is called immune dysfunction.

Immune dysfunction means just that. A dysfunction of the immune system. There are also other things that people with bipolar disorder tend to get.

One medical study showed the people with bipolar have inflammatory medical comorbidities , autoimmune disorders, chronic infections, metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, an whole body inflammatory problems.

One more major problem is called sleep-related immune changes. So yes as you can see, people with bipolar disorder tend to get more diseases and stay sick more often.

Different Types of Bipolar Disorder

There Are Actually 3 or 4 Types of Bipolar. For decades everyone knew about bipolar 1 and bipolar 2. Bipolar 1 is a little bit more severe that bipolar 2.

Some of the symptoms of bipolar 1 include mania, hyperactivity, impulsiveness, elated, irritable, wired, felling high, rapid thoughts, inflated self image and worth, excessive spending and more.

Bipolar 2 shows some of the same signs as bipolar 1 but maybe not as severe. Bipolar also as an elevated mood, euphoria, irritability over self confident, increased energy and fast speech.

Now we have a third bipolar condition that most people did not even know about.

New Types of Bipolar Disorder

The new part of bipolar is called cyclothymic disorder or Cyclothymia . Cyclothymic disorder is like bipolar disorder. Even the symptoms are nearly the same.

Cyclothymic disorder is a rare disorder that causes severe ups and downs but there not as extreme as they are in bipolar 1 and bipolar 2.

Some of the signs and symptom’s of Cyclothymic include sadness, ups and downs , crying, irritability, loss of interest in things they once enjoyed, felling’s of worthlessness, guilt, sleep problems and more.

It sounds bad because it is but it is more lesser a version of bipolar 1 and bipolar 2.

Bipolar Disorder Affects Millions of People

Bipolar is a real condition that affects millions of people from all over the world. Regardless if it is Bipolar I, Bipolar 2 or Bipolar III They are still real diseases that require real treatment.

Having bipolar disorder is not a temporary moment. Having bipolar disorder is a life long disease that should be treated for the rest of your life.

Always talk to your doctor, get on the right medication therapy and go to therapy. If you feel anything going wrong, always talk to your doctor.

Coping With Bipolar Disorder

These self-help tips can help you cope with bipolar disorder, cope with symptoms, and avoid relapse.

Therapy can help you learn to cope with the disorder, deal with problems, regulate mood, change how you think, and improve relationships.

This is known as bipolar coping. These tips also help other mental health conditions.

If you work to practice your coping skills and strategies, this may enhance the results that you receive from bipolar disorder treatment with a licensed mental health professional.

Education about bipolar disorder can empower and motivate you to adhere to your treatment plan and acknowledge changes in mood.

Family support and communication can help you stick with your treatment plan and can help you and those close to you recognize and handle the warning signs of your mental illness.

Bipolar Disorder Coping Strategies

Developing and sticking to a daily routine, along with taking your medication, can help stabilize the mood swings of bipolar disorder.

Staying active and eating well Eating well and staying in shape may help decrease symptoms of bipolar disorder, especially the depressive symptoms.

Develop a regular, consistent health routine, including drug compliance, which may be crucial for managing bipolar disorder. People that follow a structured routine with medication compliance have a lower chance of relapsing.

Research has shown that self-help strategies, planned together with a mental health professional, can be extremely helpful for managing your bipolar disorder.

Your support can have a positive impact on the life of a person living with bipolar disorder, particularly during the emotional episodes.

Although often a long-term condition, effective bipolar disorder treatments, combined with self-help techniques, can limit the effects on daily life.

The frequency and severity of these symptoms may vary by person, but there are effective coping skills that can be developed to help manage bipolar depression. It can be stressful to constantly monitor the symptoms of bipolar disorder, especially when you are just learning how it is impacting your life.

Family Support Coping for Bipolar Disorder

Having someone around to provide support and talking with a lot of bipolar patients may help to lessen any stress or anxiety you might be feeling.

Even if you have family members, loved ones, and friends to help you and let you vent and express yourself, attending a social bipolar disorder group, either in person or online, may provide tremendous benefits.

The most important aspect of coping with bipolar disorder is to find the coping methods that work for you and use them. Using the right coping methods combined with routine medication therapy can help change your life and make it so that you can live a normal life with bipolar disorder.

Living Life With Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness causing changes in state of mind, to a large manic euphoria or devastating depression, with normal functioning in-between episodes.

People with the disorder go back and forth between manic or hypomania, a state of being energetic and cheerful, or at times violent or delusional, and having episodes of depression.

Many people go through depression, and all of us feel a little bit of deep sadness from time to time, but bipolar depression is a mental battle people with bipolar disorder are going to fight throughout their lives.

Because this may make it difficult for them to understand the impact that bipolar disorder has on them, reading accounts firsthand from others who have lived through bipolar can help you to understand the condition from their point of view.

Keeping a life journal that records everyday mood symptoms, treatments, sleeping patterns, and life events can help people and their doctors keep track of and manage Bipolar disorder. When living well with bipolar disorder, seeking out treatments and tools for managing the condition–from medications and therapy, to self-care strategies and changing habits–can be incredibly helpful.

While medications can help with some symptoms of bipolar disorder, therapy teaches you skills that can be used across areas of your life. I will always have an extreme depressive cycle, as well as an extreme manic episode, but learning to control and continually work on your mental health can completely transform the way you look at life. Avoiding alcohol and illicit drugs is a huge part of recovering from a manic episode or depression symptoms, and it helps to build stability.

the bottom line is that you need to find the right king of medication therapy. Add therapist therapy to your medication and you will do great. Remember: Medications, Therapy, Family support and self support will help you maintain your bipolar disorder.

if you think that you may have bipolar disorder, please seek help as soon as possible.

For more information related to bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, panic disorder, addiction and any other mental health conditions please check out my full blog by clicking the link below

E-Bipolar.com

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